A commentary illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle
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A commentary illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle

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Published by Printed for John Stockdale in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Poetry -- Early works to 1800,
  • Aesthetics -- Early works to 1800,
  • Drama -- Technique

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby examples taken chiefly from the modern poets. To which is prefixed, a new and corrected edition of the translation of the Poetic. By Henry James Pye, esq.
GenreEarly works to 1800.
ContributionsPye, Henry James, 1745-1813., Pre-1801 Imprint Collection (Library of Congress)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPN1040.A7 P8 1792
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 564, [9] p.
Number of Pages564
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6572071M
LC Control Number14022495
OCLC/WorldCa2720911

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Excerpt from A Commentary Illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle: By Examples Taken Chiefly From the Modern Poets, to Which Is Prefixed, a New and Corrected; Edition of the Translation of the Poetic But if this was the cafe. When I ventured on the taik, it did' not long continue : Pasta blanda. Original t.p. reads: A commentary illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle, by examples taken chiefly from the modern poets. To which is prefixed, a new and corrected edition of the translation of the Poetic, by Henry James Pye, Esq. London: Printed for John Stockdale, Piccadilly, MDCCXCII. Free 2-day shipping. Buy A Commentary Illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle at nd: Aristotle. A commentary illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle: by examples taken chiefly from the modern poets. To which is prefixed, a new and corrected edition of the translation of the Poetic by Aristotle,John Adams Library (Boston Public Library) BRL,Henry James Pye,Adams, John, .

Full text of "A commentary illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle: by examples taken chiefly from the modern poets. To which is prefixed, a new and corrected edition of the translation of the Poetic". Full text of " A commentary illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle: by examples taken chiefly from the modern poets. Aristotle: A commentary illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle, (London, Printed for John Stockdale, ), also by Henry James Pye (page images at HathiTrust) Aristotle: Constitution d'Athènes; (Paris, Société d'édition "Les belles lettres", ), also by Bernard Haussoullier and Georges Mathieu (page images at HathiTrust; US access only). Alexander wrote commentaries on most of Aristotle’s treatises. His commentaries on the Prior Analytics (book 1), the Topics, the Meteorology, and On Sense Perception have survived. Of the commentary on the Metaphysics that is transmitted under his name, only the first five books are regarded as genuine.   A Commentary Illustrating the Poetic of Aristotle, By Examples Taken Chiefly from the Modern Poets. To Which is Prefixed, A new and corrected edition of the Translation of the Poetic. By Henry James Pye, Esq. London: Printed for John Stockdale, Piccadilly.

The commentary stresses major themes such as Aristotle's teleological and normative view of literature, his central demand for intelligibility of plot structure, and his virtual ignoring of the "religious" side of tragedy; it avoids minutiae and scholarly controversy.5/5(1). A source and Notes to explain the Poetics. An excellent new book which examines afresh Aristotle's Poetics and Shakespearean drama is Colin McGinn's Shakespeare's Philosophy: New York: Harper, {pp. entitled Shakespeare and Tragedy}.McGill disputes the 'tragic flaw' theory as applied to Hamlet, Lear and Macbeth regarding their moral worthiness, and as . by examples taken chiefly from the modern poets. To which is prefixed, a new and corrected edition of the translation of the Poetic. By Henry James Pye, esq. Page: 2 of 4. Please join FreeBookSummary to read the full document. Choose a Membership Plan. This also helps to draw emotion from the audience, while the aspect of spectacle merely distracts the audience and “is the least artistic, and connected least to the art of poetry,” according to Aristotle (IV).